Be Prepared for the Inevitable Crisis

How long has it been since you’ve reviewed your organization’s crisis management plan? Or do you have one in place at all? Whether you work for a company as its public relations professional or represent a client on an important project, you undoubtedly realize that bad news can hit 24-7 creating a challenge made even more difficult by the relentless hunger of social media.

As Randy Pruett says in an essay for Dallas’s Pierpoint Communications, “What happens in Vegas stays – on YouTube, Flickr, Wikipedia, Twitter and Facebook.”

We can all think of many current examples where company reputations are either crushed or salvaged, depending on prior planning and the expertise and training of the leadership, employees and public relations team.

Here are several of Pruett’s key tips for avoiding public relations nightmares:

  1. It is crucial to get your side of the story out as quickly as possible. In a crisis, one member of your public relations team should respond to all inquiries. This avoids conflicting, inaccurate or incomplete information.
  2. Role-play different crisis scenarios before they happen. Be authentic and avoid brainless spin. Avoid speculation when you don’t have a clear direction.
  3. Tell your employees what’s going on in person versus in writing, if possible. Although personal meetings can certainly be recorded via cell phone, emails and internal memos definitely get leaked to the media, posted on blogs or appear in all types of social media.
  4. Communicate with clients and customers. As much as possible, business should continue as normal.
  5. Know that public relations has limits. PR alone can’t fix a 10,000-barrel a day oil leak or improve disastrous financials. But it can enhance your reputation in the long term by the way you handle a crisis when it strikes.
  6. Keep your public relations team in the loop and seek their guidance when choosing a course of action. They are your company’s first line of defense.

For a look at some interesting social media statistics go to Erik Qualman’s popular “Social Media Revolution 2” video and www.socialnomics.net.

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